DIY Budget Friendly Fall Wreath

 The materials All gathered from my front yard. Bark, fern clippings, tree clippings, etc. I also bought preserved leaves, spanish moss, and potpourri.

The materials
All gathered from my front yard. Bark, fern clippings, tree clippings, etc. I also bought preserved leaves, spanish moss, and potpourri.

 The base I made a base out of paper, tin foil, and duck tape. Then I covered it in spanish moss I bought from the dollar store.

The base
I made a base out of paper, tin foil, and duck tape. Then I covered it in spanish moss I bought from the dollar store.

Adding green This is where it got tedious. I started adding green sprigs by gluing them individually.

Adding green
This is where it got tedious. I started adding green sprigs by gluing them individually.

 Done with the green

Done with the green

Adding leaves I bought preserved leaves from Kroger (who knew?) for about $3. Glued them on individually.

Adding leaves
I bought preserved leaves from Kroger (who knew?) for about $3. Glued them on individually.

Done The last step was to add bark, potpourri, more sprigs, and moss. It took me about 1.5 hrs total.

Done
The last step was to add bark, potpourri, more sprigs, and moss. It took me about 1.5 hrs total.

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 11:26 pm

Categories: Tutorials   Tags:

DIY Penny Top Coffee Table

Started by measuring out good dimensions for a table and welding the top frame together

Started by measuring out good dimensions for a table and welding the top frame together

after welding the legs together I added a lower level shelf made from some old wood pallets that I found around the shop

after welding the legs together I added a lower level shelf made from some old wood pallets that I found around the shop

the actual table top is half inch plywood. I figured I would need some extra support if I was putting around 19 dollars worth of pennies on top

the actual table top is half inch plywood. I figured I would need some extra support if I was putting around 19 dollars worth of pennies on top

my penny collection isn't enough!

my penny collection isn’t enough!

I enlisted my room mates to help design

I enlisted my room mates to help design

I ultimately landed on the pyramid theme.

I ultimately landed on the pyramid theme.

7 - X3BvOng

I Used some wheat pennies I separated from the collection for the top inner triangle Now to wait for sealer!

I Used some wheat pennies I separated from the collection for the top inner triangle
Now to wait for sealer!

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 11:19 pm

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DIY Budget Friendly Vinyl Frames

Slide-out frames I wanted to be able to easily access my vinyls without spending a lot of money on fancy vinyl frames

Slide-out frames
I wanted to be able to easily access my vinyls without spending a lot of money on fancy vinyl frames

Materials Bag of cheap craft wood, leftover wood nails, some paint, 3M wall hanging strips (and a paintbrush and hammer and scissors)

Materials
Bag of cheap craft wood, leftover wood nails, some paint, 3M wall hanging strips (and a paintbrush and hammer and scissors)

 L-shape  L-shape

L-shape
L-shape

3M strips Cut the 3M strips length-wise and adhered them according to the instructions

3M strips
Cut the 3M strips length-wise and adhered them according to the instructions

 Black paint I didn't feel comfortable painting parts that would come into contact with the vinyl or the wall... also saves paint!

Black paint
I didn’t feel comfortable painting parts that would come into contact with the vinyl or the wall… also saves paint!

Voil Simple, functional frames, for oh so very cheap.

Voil
Simple, functional frames, for oh so very cheap.

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 11:06 pm

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DIY Doctor Who Door Decoration

This is the extra door I had in my room.  Bolted it shut and removed the doorknob.

This is the extra door I had in my room. Bolted it shut and removed the doorknob.

Went to a nearby lumberyard and cut some very cheap wood.

Went to a nearby lumberyard and cut some very cheap wood.

Used wood glue and 1/3 inch tacking nails to put up the wood veneers.

Used wood glue and 1/3 inch tacking nails to put up the wood veneers.

spiffy.

spiffy.

Got some blue paint and used painter's tape to tape off all the parts I didnt want coloured.

Got some blue paint and used painter’s tape to tape off all the parts I didnt want coloured.

spiffier

spiffier

Free handed the top lettering using tape and an X-acto knife.  So, to do this, you tape off the entire area then cut the lettering out of the tape on the wall and remove all the tape this is not forming a letter.  paint over everything.

Free handed the top lettering using tape and an X-acto knife. So, to do this, you tape off the entire area then cut the lettering out of the tape on the wall and remove all the tape this is not forming a letter. paint over everything.

Now peel the letter tape off and you have the original white beneath.

Now peel the letter tape off and you have the original white beneath.

windows made of plastic with pieces of wood gorilla glued on.

windows made of plastic with pieces of wood gorilla glued on.

Cut the plastic to be an exact fit in the open spaces, no fixatives required here if cut precisely enough.  However...a couple dabe of gorilla glue in the top or bottom corners doesn't hurt.

Cut the plastic to be an exact fit in the open spaces, no fixatives required here if cut precisely enough. However…a couple dabe of gorilla glue in the top or bottom corners doesn’t hurt.

add frilly stuff: a silver door handle, an outdoor hanging lantern, the public notice.

add frilly stuff: a silver door handle, an outdoor hanging lantern, the public notice.

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 11:02 pm

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DIY Slate Tile Stair Design

Before and After Here's a look at our laminate flooring foyer (from the front door), up the carpeted stairs - approx. 8  years old.

Before and After
Here’s a look at our laminate flooring foyer (from the front door), up the carpeted stairs – approx. 8 years old.

End of first day Close-up of the de-laminated floor, and the first few slate tiles being laid down. Removed the baseboards as well, which were re-painted and re-installed afterwards

End of first day
Close-up of the de-laminated floor, and the first few slate tiles being laid down. Removed the baseboards as well, which were re-painted and re-installed afterwards

View from top of plank Built a 2x4 ramp to avoid stepping on the freshly laid slate - worked quite well, felt a bit Cirque de Soleil'ish, especially having to carry the dog :P

View from top of plank
Built a 2×4 ramp to avoid stepping on the freshly laid slate – worked quite well, felt a bit Cirque de Soleil’ish, especially having to carry the dog :P

View from bottom of plank View of the stairs from the bottom, showing what the bare wood underneath the carpet looked like... also the tight-rope walk up the plank. You can see the Oak wood nosing we installed as well.

View from bottom of plank
View of the stairs from the bottom, showing what the bare wood underneath the carpet looked like… also the tight-rope walk up the plank. You can see the Oak wood nosing we installed as well.

End of second day Laid down quite a bit more of the slate on the main floor - able to walk on the areas that were done the previous day now.

End of second day
Laid down quite a bit more of the slate on the main floor – able to walk on the areas that were done the previous day now.

View from the top You can see the makeshift ladder between the 2nd step and near the top of the stairs - this was on for one night to avoid any walking on the slate that was laid that day. Much steeper, but worked well when we put the steps on

View from the top
You can see the makeshift ladder between the 2nd step and near the top of the stairs – this was on for one night to avoid any walking on the slate that was laid that day. Much steeper, but worked well when we put the steps on

Close-up of Oak nosing This was post-first staining of the Oak. Used a water-based stain, Dark Walnut colour and wipe down after the first application. Being water-based, was easy to remove from the grout/tile

Close-up of Oak nosing
This was post-first staining of the Oak. Used a water-based stain, Dark Walnut colour and wipe down after the first application. Being water-based, was easy to remove from the grout/tile

Almost done This was after removing the wax paper from the sides of the Oak nosing (to stop staining the wall), and due to the carpet removal y ou see some areas where the paint actually chipped away. Also, we weren't totally stoked with only one coat of the stain - looking better though.

Almost done
This was after removing the wax paper from the sides of the Oak nosing (to stop staining the wall), and due to the carpet removal y ou see some areas where the paint actually chipped away. Also, we weren’t totally stoked with only one coat of the stain – looking better though.

Final floor with dirty ass mat This is with the baseboards painted and re-installed, grouting completed, and the slate tile sealed in with treatment. We went with a pewter-colour grout. We're replacing that mat, as now the floor is slightly higher and the garage door actually catches the mat - plus it's nasty ;)

Final floor with dirty ass mat
This is with the baseboards painted and re-installed, grouting completed, and the slate tile sealed in with treatment. We went with a pewter-colour grout. We’re replacing that mat, as now the floor is slightly higher and the garage door actually catches the mat – plus it’s nasty ;)

 Finished You can see the difference after a second coat of stain, and then finish on the Oak. As well, you can see the touch-ups required on the wall beside each step to fix the paint/gouging that occurred (first photo)

Finished
You can see the difference after a second coat of stain, and then finish on the Oak. As well, you can see the touch-ups required on the wall beside each step to fix the paint/gouging that occurred (first photo)

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 10:58 pm

Categories: Tutorials   Tags:

DIY Worn Wooden Map Gifts

I bought a map of the Philippines off eBay - my map dimensions were 17.5" wide by 27" tall, and I knew I wanted the map divided into horizontal sections (I forgot to rotate the image). I bought a 6 foot 1x10 common board at Home Depot for about $10 and had them cut it into three 17.5" sections. This gave me about 28" vertically to work with. In retrospect I would have tried hard to get closer to 27" but it still turned out well.

I bought a map of the Philippines off eBay – my map dimensions were 17.5″ wide by 27″ tall, and I knew I wanted the map divided into horizontal sections (I forgot to rotate the image). I bought a 6 foot 1×10 common board at Home Depot for about $10 and had them cut it into three 17.5″ sections. This gave me about 28″ vertically to work with. In retrospect I would have tried hard to get closer to 27″ but it still turned out well.

Using a knife, I began slicing the corners and gouging out sections along the edges to give the wood a worn appearance.

Using a knife, I began slicing the corners and gouging out sections along the edges to give the wood a worn appearance.

With the bulk of the material gone, I used 120 grit sandpaper to soften the corners and smooth out my work. I also sanded the top face of the wood to make sure the map would adhere smoothly without any bumps or ridges.

With the bulk of the material gone, I used 120 grit sandpaper to soften the corners and smooth out my work. I also sanded the top face of the wood to make sure the map would adhere smoothly without any bumps or ridges.

Here are my three sections after giving them a weathered appearance.

Here are my three sections after giving them a weathered appearance.

Home depot sells their returned paint products at a discount, so I picked up can of red mahogany wood stain for about $4. I lathered it on and didn't wipe the excess off, so the coat wasn't very even. This is okay because I planned on sanding the visible parts to bring out different layers of the stain anyway.

Home depot sells their returned paint products at a discount, so I picked up can of red mahogany wood stain for about $4. I lathered it on and didn’t wipe the excess off, so the coat wasn’t very even. This is okay because I planned on sanding the visible parts to bring out different layers of the stain anyway.

I cut my map into 3 equal pieces for each wood plank. Here is where I realized that having 0.25" borders on the top and bottom of each section might be a little much, so again I recommend trying to match the dimensions of your map as closely as possible.

I cut my map into 3 equal pieces for each wood plank. Here is where I realized that having 0.25″ borders on the top and bottom of each section might be a little much, so again I recommend trying to match the dimensions of your map as closely as possible.

Before adhering the map, I trimmed the map to the same shape as the flat surface of the wood. You can just glue it down and sand off the excess later without trimming, but getting the large portions off with scissors is a lot easier.

Before adhering the map, I trimmed the map to the same shape as the flat surface of the wood. You can just glue it down and sand off the excess later without trimming, but getting the large portions off with scissors is a lot easier.

I used Mod Podge ($7 at Michael's) to glue the maps down. I lined up the map and used a heavy glass on the left side to hold it in place while I lifted the right side and spread on a thin layer of Mod Podge using a paint brush. Be careful not to use too much -- you can ooze out a little excess, but overdo it and the map material may soak up some of the glue. This video (which was my original inspiration) gives you a good idea of how to do it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxSe0XXMRDs With the map glued down, I sanded down the edges of the map and wore off the stain in some parts. I was surprised at how quickly it started to look like an authentic, historic ma

I used Mod Podge ($7 at Michael’s) to glue the maps down. I lined up the map and used a heavy glass on the left side to hold it in place while I lifted the right side and spread on a thin layer of Mod Podge using a paint brush. Be careful not to use too much — you can ooze out a little excess, but overdo it and the map material may soak up some of the glue. This video (which was my original inspiration) gives you a good idea of how to do it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxSe0XXMRDs
With the map glued down, I sanded down the edges of the map and wore off the stain in some parts. I was surprised at how quickly it started to look like an authentic, historic ma

Here's the finished product. I'll be giving this one to my girlfriend for Christmas (she's half Filipino).

Here’s the finished product. I’ll be giving this one to my girlfriend for Christmas (she’s half Filipino).

Here are two other smaller maps I made, for my mom and sister (from Colorado and Chicago).

Here are two other smaller maps I made, for my mom and sister (from Colorado and Chicago).

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 10:53 pm

Categories: Tutorials   Tags:

DIY Map Design Table Top

Got the table top sanded down to adhere the map better

Got the table top sanded down to adhere the map better

 The stickiest fasting drying stuff on earth

The stickiest fasting drying stuff on earth

Got the map onto the table After it was on I cut the edges that were draping further over the side of the table and then sanded them to the edge.

Got the map onto the table
After it was on I cut the edges that were draping further over the side of the table and then sanded them to the edge.

Had to let it sit to dry for 3 hours

Had to let it sit to dry for 3 hours

Brought it inside to deal with the messier things

Brought it inside to deal with the messier things

 Grabbed some mod podge

Grabbed some mod podge

Lathered that baby up for some extra adhesion

Lathered that baby up for some extra adhesion

There were some bubbles That you can totally not see....

There were some bubbles
That you can totally not see….

so blow dryer Actually a bad idea later on with the acrylic top. It causes cracks.

so blow dryer
Actually a bad idea later on with the acrylic top. It causes cracks.

After the mod podge I had to cover it in acrylic floor finish Had to do the process five times: cover in acrylic finish, wait three hours, sand down top. This was the hardest part, but gives it the preservation it needs and a much better look.

After the mod podge I had to cover it in acrylic floor finish
Had to do the process five times: cover in acrylic finish, wait three hours, sand down top. This was the hardest part, but gives it the preservation it needs and a much better look.

Had to actually build the table

Had to actually build the table

Got the info for the awesome map I used and slapped that shit on the bottom of the table

Got the info for the awesome map I used and slapped that shit on the bottom of the table

 See

See

 It's  finished Wooooo

It’s finished Wooooo

 I like it D

I like it D

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 10:40 pm

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DIY Budget Friendly Computer Speaker Stands

I got a pair of AudioEngine 2 computer speakers for Christmas

I got a pair of AudioEngine 2 computer speakers for Christmas

Quick sketch basic design

Quick sketch basic design

Cut all the pieces from a single plank that cost about 10 this is after I cut it in half

Cut all the pieces from a single plank that cost about 10 this is after I cut it in half

 Ghetto photo of a ghetto workspace I039m just visiting home and my parents are renovating so I had to make do

Ghetto photo of a ghetto workspace I039m just visiting home and my parents are renovating so I had to make do

 Pieces of one stand cut

Pieces of one stand cut

Holes drilled and ready for screwing

Holes drilled and ready for screwing

The support structure assembled

The support structure assembled

Im no carpenter and they039re pretty basic but I was happy with how they turned out

Im no carpenter and they039re pretty basic but I was happy with how they turned out

- Time for staining First coat

– Time for staining First coat

In between coats Sanded back the first one

In between coats Sanded back the first one

 Voila Not too shabby will do the job

Voila Not too shabby will do the job

 I reckon they look great Playing some Hotline Miami dat soundtrack

I reckon they look great Playing some Hotline Miami dat soundtrack

I discovered the base also works as a nifty little CD stand

I discovered the base also works as a nifty little CD stand

 Not bad for ten bucks compared to the ludicrous amount I could have spent on some shitty plastic ones

Not bad for ten bucks compared to the ludicrous amount I could have spent on some shitty plastic ones

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 10:35 pm

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DIY C&H/Peanuts Lawn Ornaments

All done It's meant to look best at night  I was surprised that the two floods gave off enough light to illuminate the entire scene.  We have cars stopping in front of the house all the time now, but it's OK.  We live on a corner so people have time to take a look while they're at the stop sign.

All done
It’s meant to look best at night I was surprised that the two floods gave off enough light to illuminate the entire scene. We have cars stopping in front of the house all the time now, but it’s OK. We live on a corner so people have time to take a look while they’re at the stop sign.

The original pic I just pasted up a bunch of images I found on the net that I thought would make good cut-outs

The original pic
I just pasted up a bunch of images I found on the net that I thought would make good cut-outs

The tracings I borrowed a digital projector from work and hooked my laptop up to it to project the pictures onto these bits of scrap siding board, then traced them out with a sharpie

The tracings
I borrowed a digital projector from work and hooked my laptop up to it to project the pictures onto these bits of scrap siding board, then traced them out with a sharpie

more tracings - calvin

more tracings – calvin

Tracing of Hobbes Hobbes was probably the most detailed of all the characters.

Tracing of Hobbes
Hobbes was probably the most detailed of all the characters.

Snoopy all done I noticed how much more involved the designs were for Calvin and Hobbes than Snoopy and Charlie Brown's.  Different styles of drawing.

Snoopy all done
I noticed how much more involved the designs were for Calvin and Hobbes than Snoopy and Charlie Brown’s. Different styles of drawing.

Woodstock all done Woodstock in the comics is sort of a little yellow blob with a few lines tacked on, so it was kind of hard to figure out a good shape to cut out

Woodstock all done
Woodstock in the comics is sort of a little yellow blob with a few lines tacked on, so it was kind of hard to figure out a good shape to cut out

Charlie Brown all done I had to make up a mouth shape for Chuck because the original one had him smiling.  The idea was for all the characters to be standing around the sad tree looking like "wtf?"

Charlie Brown all done
I had to make up a mouth shape for Chuck because the original one had him smiling. The idea was for all the characters to be standing around the sad tree looking like “wtf?”

Calvin all done same with Calvin's mouth shape - had to sort of make it up.   The hardest part of the whole thing was painting all the round shapes for the eyes, eyebrows, mouths, and noses.  All I had was flat and long sponge paintbrushes, so it took some careful hands and a lot of patience and whiskey.  It was cold in my workshop.

Calvin all done
same with Calvin’s mouth shape – had to sort of make it up. The hardest part of the whole thing was painting all the round shapes for the eyes, eyebrows, mouths, and noses. All I had was flat and long sponge paintbrushes, so it took some careful hands and a lot of patience and whiskey. It was cold in my workshop.

Hobbes I was most proud of Hobbes.  He really came out great.  Notice that many of them don't have shoes/feet--all the good winter scenes I could find they were standing in snow.  That's why I made the snowdrifts to put in front of them, to hide the feet that aren't there :)

Hobbes
I was most proud of Hobbes. He really came out great. Notice that many of them don’t have shoes/feet–all the good winter scenes I could find they were standing in snow. That’s why I made the snowdrifts to put in front of them, to hide the feet that aren’t there :)

All the cutouts done Here they are lined up waiting to go in the front yard

All the cutouts done
Here they are lined up waiting to go in the front yard

 The scene by day I had to look around a bit for a good branch.  Finally wound up cutting one of the top branches from a crepe myrtle in my front yard and taking all the leafy twigs from it for the tree.  Cut a point in the bottom and just stuck it in the ground.  Old blue blanket, a few stakes, some Christmas lights, and a single ornament.

The scene by day
I had to look around a bit for a good branch. Finally wound up cutting one of the top branches from a crepe myrtle in my front yard and taking all the leafy twigs from it for the tree. Cut a point in the bottom and just stuck it in the ground. Old blue blanket, a few stakes, some Christmas lights, and a single ornament.

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 10:25 pm

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DIY Engravable Hardcover Book

Loose blank cardstock, roughly 7" x 12". I happened to have a surplus of this hanging around so I sized my book according to the stock.

Loose blank cardstock, roughly 7″ x 12″. I happened to have a surplus of this hanging around so I sized my book according to the stock.

Printing on front & back of each page. Layout takes a while, so make a small guide book (which can be seen in the bottom left) of which images should go on the front/back of each page beforehand.

Printing on front & back of each page. Layout takes a while, so make a small guide book (which can be seen in the bottom left) of which images should go on the front/back of each page beforehand.

Clamping the book together, adding spacers between the clamp and the cover to prevent any pressure points from ruining the look of the cover. The front cover or your book should be cut about 1/8" shorter left-to-right, I'll get to why shortly.

Clamping the book together, adding spacers between the clamp and the cover to prevent any pressure points from ruining the look of the cover. The front cover or your book should be cut about 1/8″ shorter left-to-right, I’ll get to why shortly.

Post drilling. The black heavy pieces which I am using for the cover are "superblack illustration board", they come in large sheets and are fairly easy to cut to size with an exacto knife - just take your time and measure twice before you cut. After the holes are drilled you'll need to tidy up the rims a bit with an exacto, just to keep everything neat.

Post drilling. The black heavy pieces which I am using for the cover are “superblack illustration board”, they come in large sheets and are fairly easy to cut to size with an exacto knife – just take your time and measure twice before you cut. After the holes are drilled you’ll need to tidy up the rims a bit with an exacto, just to keep everything neat.

Once you're happy with the cuts, and the cleaning, you're going to need to make one more cut on the front cover. This will be made about 1.5" from the binding side, and allows your book to open. After you've cut the piece off, carefully realign it while adding the 1/8" of open space and begin to attach both pieces together with Book Tape. This tape has that cloth feel to it, and provides a great movable binding that will last for a long time.

Once you’re happy with the cuts, and the cleaning, you’re going to need to make one more cut on the front cover. This will be made about 1.5″ from the binding side, and allows your book to open. After you’ve cut the piece off, carefully realign it while adding the 1/8″ of open space and begin to attach both pieces together with Book Tape. This tape has that cloth feel to it, and provides a great movable binding that will last for a long time.

Next up, scoring the paper. This is annoying, but it's necessary for the pages to lie somewhat flat and evenly. You can get a bone scorer at most art supply shops, or ( and i know this is tacky ) buy the Martha Stewart paper scoring kit - which is what I ended up doing. It works much better than I expected, and if you find a coupon at for the craft store you can likely pick it up for between $10-$15. Another note about paper scoring: I chose to "graduate" each page score about 1/16" according to how they were laid out in the book. This allows each page to fold open in it's own space so the pages aren't all crammed by the end of your book.

Next up, scoring the paper. This is annoying, but it’s necessary for the pages to lie somewhat flat and evenly. You can get a bone scorer at most art supply shops, or ( and i know this is tacky ) buy the Martha Stewart paper scoring kit – which is what I ended up doing. It works much better than I expected, and if you find a coupon at for the craft store you can likely pick it up for between $10-$15.
Another note about paper scoring: I chose to “graduate” each page score about 1/16″ according to how they were laid out in the book. This allows each page to fold open in it’s own space so the pages aren’t all crammed by the end of your book.

Final scoring of each page., and realignment.

Final scoring of each page., and realignment.

Screwposts being added and sized for the thickness of the book, you can also pick these up at a craft or hardware store.

Screwposts being added and sized for the thickness of the book, you can also pick these up at a craft or hardware store.

Binding finished, first flip-through of the book...

Binding finished, first flip-through of the book…

Impact Stamp addition. For an extra touch I wanted a subtle addition to my cover. I had these antique impact stamps lying around but did not have enough letters for my full name, so I went with just my initials. This is a pretty simple transfer process as you really just hit each letter with a hammer a few times, but if you're going with this option TAKE YOUR TIME. You can completely destroy the clean professional look of the cover if you add these crooked, or took close/far apart etc..

Impact Stamp addition. For an extra touch I wanted a subtle addition to my cover. I had these antique impact stamps lying around but did not have enough letters for my full name, so I went with just my initials. This is a pretty simple transfer process as you really just hit each letter with a hammer a few times, but if you’re going with this option TAKE YOUR TIME. You can completely destroy the clean professional look of the cover if you add these crooked, or took close/far apart etc..

Closeup of the front right corner of the book.

Closeup of the front right corner of the book.

Once I was finished I actually was bored by the interior cover being blank, so I added a simple envelope to hold business cards and any other info I would want to bring around with my portfolio.

Once I was finished I actually was bored by the interior cover being blank, so I added a simple envelope to hold business cards and any other info I would want to bring around with my portfolio.

Final book.

Final book.

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Posted by Lifenags - August 11, 2014 at 10:15 pm

Categories: Tutorials   Tags:

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